TAGS

Recent Posts

Archives

How to Install Oracle EPM (Hyperion): Installing FDMEE (Bonus Post of Four-Part Series)
Posted on February 11, 2015
Author: Tom Blakeley, Performance Architects

To say that I am a big fan of Oracle Hyperion Financial Data Management Enterprise Edition (FDMEE) would be an understatement. After a couple of blog posts and multiple implementations, I’ve become mildly obsessed. I want to teach you how to use the product because FDMEE is the go-forward application for on premise Oracle Enterprise Performance Management (EPM or Hyperion) solutions data management, as well as the data management option for Oracle Planning and Budgeting Cloud Service (PBCS) (the software-as-a-service version of Oracle Hyperion Planning).  The four blog posts related to this subject include:

  • Part 1.  Covers the download and assembly of the installation folder, as well as the creation of required product schemas.
  • Part 2.  Reviews the installation of Oracle Hyperion Planning and Oracle Essbase.
  • Part 3.  Outlines the configuration process.
  • Part 4.  Shows how to install the 11.1.2.3.500 patches for both Oracle Hyperion Planning and Oracle Essbase.

This is the first blog post, of many, about how to use the FDMEE solution. In order to follow along, you need to have a local installation of the tool. To do so, I am expecting that you have an existing environment locally installed; if not, I’ve created a blog series on how to locally install Oracle Essbase and Oracle Hyperion Planning to help you get started.

One important note: this installation is on a Windows Server 2008R2 machine.

1. First, access your local Oracle database instance and create a separate table space (make sure to set it to “No Logging”).

2. Second, run the following script to create an FDMEE user.

  • CREATE USER EPM_FDMEE IDENTIFIED BY password
  • DEFAULT TABLESPACE “EPM_FDMEE”
  • QUOTA UNLIMITED ON “EPM_FDMEE”;
  • GRANT CREATE ANY CLUSTER TO EPM_FDMEE;
  • GRANT CREATE ANY INDEXTYPE TO EPM_FDMEE;
  • GRANT CREATE ANY PROCEDURE TO EPM_FDMEE;
  • GRANT CREATE ANY SEQUENCE TO EPM_FDMEE;
  • GRANT CREATE ANY SYNONYM TO EPM_FDMEE;
  • GRANT CREATE SESSION TO EPM_FDMEE;
  • GRANT CREATE TABLE TO EPM_FDMEE;
  • GRANT CREATE TRIGGER TO EPM_FDMEE;
  • GRANT CREATE TYPE TO EPM_FDMEE;
  • GRANT CREATE VIEW TO EPM_FDMEE;
  • GRANT DROP ANY SYNONYM TO EPM_FDMEE;
  • GRANT UNLIMITED TABLESPACE TO EPM_FDMEE;

3. Start up the Oracle installer. If you don’t have one created, look to my previous blog posts to get started. Once up and running, click “Next.”

4. Select to install into the directory previously used by your EPM instance if expanding out an environment (like I am here).

5. Perform a new installation.

6. Uncheck all and then select “FDM Enterprise Edition” from the product components list. The database clients will autoselect along with the “HFM ADM” driver.

7. Note that Oracle Data Integrator (ODI) will install automatically!

8. Once the installation is complete, click “Configure” to launch the Configurator. When the Configurator launches, confirm the “Home” directory and EPM Oracle Instance.

9. Choose to configure the “FDMEE Database,” and deploy it to the application server. You can choose to uncheck “Configure DCOM” if you do not have an installation of Hyperion Financial Management (HFM).

10. Utilize the schema created earlier for the database user for this configuration.

11. Deploy to your existing WebLogic domain.

12. Deploy to a separate server.

13. Confirm the configuration.

14. Allow the configuration to run.

15. Once configuration is complete, FDMEE is set up.

16. Depending on your instance version, you may need to patch FDMEE up to a newer release than the base 11.1.2.3 version.

Author: Tom Blakeley, Performance Architects

 

Share
© Performance Architects, Inc. and Performance Architects Blog, 2006 - present. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog's author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Performance Architects, Inc. and Performance Architects Blog with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *